Loftin Family Vacation

   


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Table of
Contents


Elizabethan
Gardens

Manteo, NC

NC Lighthouses
Outer Banks, NC

Currituck
Beach

Lighthouse

Bodie
Island

Lighthouse

Cape
Hatteras

Lighthouse

Cape
Lookout

Lighthouse

Wright
Brothers
Memorial

Kill Devil Hills, NC

2001
Beach Trip
Outer Banks

Kill Devil Hills, NC

____________

LOFTIN
GENEALOGY
LINE


The
LOFTIN
Family
Tree


Philip
Daniel
Loftin

(1978 - 20??)

Curtis
Dean
Loftin

(1953 - 20??)

Sam
William
Loftin

(1918 - 1979)

Alonzo
Lester
Loftin

(1876 - 1937)

William Alexander
Loftin

(1851 - 1939)

James
Franklin
Loftin

(1827 - 1864)

Thomas
Loftin

(1798 - 185?)

James
Loftin

(1768 - 1836)

John
Loftin

(1740 - 1793)

Cornelius
Loftin III

(1714 - 1785)

Cornelius
Loftin II

(1675 - 1735)

Cornelius
Loftin I

(1648 - 1735)

Leonard
"Laughton"
Loftin

(1610 - 1678)
_______

FAMILY
NAMES

LOFTIN:
 Beatty
 Corzine
 Cranford
 Fisher
 Givens
 Harwell
 Kaiser
 Lanier
 Lomax
 McCorkle
 Rudisill
 Sherrill
 Upright
 Washington
 Work


SETZER:
Aderholdt
Barringer
Bovey
Bushart
Deal
Heavner
Herman
Ikert
Miller
Motz
Rankin
Witherspoon

GOBLE:
Babst/Bobst
Douglas
Faber
Fink
Fulbright
Hefner
Meinhert
Miller
Muller
Pabst/Bobst
Robinson

JOHNSON:
Corzine
Fink
Hamilton
Kaiser
Leslie
Lewis
Moore
Sherrill
Upright
Wilkinson

 

Additional
Family
SURNAMES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

The Outer Banks
Lighthouses, Gardens and Museums

 

Curtis & Carolyn Loftin

16 - 23 Jun 2001

 
Our entire family did a summer beach trip to the North Carolina Outer Banks from Saturday June 16 to Saturday Jun 23 in 2001. Not only did we enjoy the beach, but we visited the Elizabethan Gardens, saw The Lost Colony drama, visited the Wilbur & Orville Wright Brothers Museum as well as the various Lighthouses on the NC Coast.
 
 
 
 
 
 

Elizabethan Gardens

 
 
On 16 June 2001, as we were going through Manteo, we decided to stop and tour the Elizabethan Gardens. It cost $5 each for entrance, but the gardens were absolutely beautiful.
 
 
Fanciful and elaborate gardens were kept to entertain Queen Elizabeth I during her reign. The Elizabethan Gardens in Manteo, NC, was created for your enjoyment, and as a living memorial to the time when Sir Walter Raleigh’s lost colonists lived in this very place over 400 years ago. 
 
 
Curtis gets a photo of the family outside of the Elizabethan Gardens
 
 
The English-Style Gardens had beautiful flowers, shrubs , trees and statuary
 
 
Brad, Beth and Savanna
 
 
 
 
Philip and Leslie
 
 
 
This beautiful blue-lace hydrangea was one of my favorites - so I had to buy one for my own garden
 
 
 
 
 
They say "the apple don't fall far from the tree" - but I don't know about this
 
The gardens were beautiful, but we had to eventually move on to the purpose for the whole trip - the beach
 
 
 
 

North Carolina Coastal Lighthouses

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Currituck Beach Lighthouse

 
 

Sunday afternoon, 17 June 2001, Carolyn and I drove through Duck, NC, and headed to Corolla to see the Currituck Beach Lighthouse. Both Duck and Corolla were extremely nice communities, but Corolla was definitely for the elite.

 
 
 
Currituck Beach Lighthouse
 
 

When we were there (2001), the Currituck Beach Lighthouse is the only lighthouse that was still open to the public so that you could climb to the top. Cape Hatteras Lighthouse had been closed to the public the week before we got there.

 
 
 
 
Carolyn snaps a photo of Curtis
 
 
 
Carolyn didn't want to climb to the top of the lighthouse, but I did. I paid $5 and headed toward the top.
 
After I had climbed the first few flights of stairs, I looked up toward the top, and then back down toward the bottom.
I didn't care if I had paid $5 for the opportunity to climb to the top, I wasn't so sure that I could do it.
 
 
Climbing to the top of the Currituck Lighthouse
   
 
 
Finally, however, I pulled together enough courage to continue on to the top. I finally made it and the view was beautiful.
Even though I did make it to the top, I still had a hard time making myself get out on the deck around the massive light.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Visitors can still climb the winding staircase, 220 steps in all, to the top of the lighthouse for a panoramic view of Currituck Sound, the Atlantic Ocean and the Currituck Outer Banks. Inside the lighthouse, at the base and on the first two landings, there are lighthouse exhibits. On the way up or down, you can stop to learn about the history of the coastal lighthouses.
 
 
The Currituck Lighthouse Caretaker's House
  
 
 
Like the other lighthouses on North Carolina’s Outer Banks, this one still serves as an aid to navigation.
The beacon comes on automatically every evening at dusk and ceases at dawn.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Bodie Island Lighthouse

 
 

On Monday June 18th, we all decided to check out Bodie Island Lighthouse and Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. It was about an hour drive from where we were staying in Kill Devill Hills, NC, to the lighthouse.

 

 
 
Everyone, except for me, posed while I got a group of them with the lighthouse and keeper's quarters
 
 
 
 
(Left) Philip & Leslie; (Right) Philip, Leslie, Beth & Savanna, Brad
 
 
 
 
 
I (Curtis) manage to get a photo of my with the lighthouse, too
 
 
Checking out other parts of the Island
 
 

Bodie's Island Lighthouse is an exact duplicate of the Currituck Beach Lighthouse and were both built by the same architect.
The only difference is the fact that Currituck kept its brick veneer while Body's Island Lighthouse was painted with black and white stripes.
The current structure was erected in 1872 - Seven years after the end of the American Civil War.

 
Chart from www.nps.gov
 
 
A few final photos of the lighthouse before we leave
   
 
    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Cape Hatteras Lighthouse

 
 

After visiting Bodie Island Lighthouse, we moved on to check out the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. Humidity was extremely high during the Hatteras tour. We were also disappointed that we couldn't go inside either.

 
 
Brad, Beth and Savanna at the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse
 
 
 
 
 
Curtis poses for a photo
 
 

 

 
 
Philip, Leslie, Brad, Beth and Savanna
 
 

 
 
  
 
 
 
Post Card: Cape Hatteras before the move
 

 
 
Cape Hatteras Lighthouse is the tallest brick lighthouse in the US.
   
 
 
 
 
 

Cape Lookout Lighthouse

 
 

We didn't visit Cape Lookout Lighthouse on this trip to the Outer Banks. We did a beach trip with Dennis & Pat Hass in March 1998 and visited this particular lighthouse at that time. The following photos of the Cape Lookout Lighthouse were taken at that time.

 
 
We drove to historic Beauford, NC, to catch our boat to Cape Lookout
 
We rode the Crystal Queen to get to the Cape Lookout Lighthouse
 
 
Cape Lookout National Seashore preserves a 56-mile long section of the Southern Outer Banks, or Crystal Coast, of North Carolina, running from Ocracoke Inlet on the northeast to Beaufort Inlet on the southeast. The seashore includes  Shackleford's wild horses and the Cape Lookout Lighthouse, which has a black-and-white diamond pattern.
 
Built in 1859, the Cape Lookout Lighthouse is located on the Cape Lookout National Seashore.
There is a Light Station Visitor Center and Keepers' Quarters Museum also on the premises.
 
Our first look of the Cape Lookout Lighthouse as we approached the island
 
   
 
 
 
 
Enjoying the other sights before we head back to the Beauford
 
 
The wild horses of the Outer Banks are North Carolina's official state horse. These mustang ponies are descended from horses brought here by Spanish explorers of the New World and have lived there, stranded, for more than 500 years ago. It's because of this desolation, coupled with the help from the Corolla Wild Horse Fund, that the wild horses are able to thrive, relatively undisturbed by the limited development that has sprung up around them. It is illegal (and dangerous) to approach within 50 feet of the horses. It is also illegal to feed them. Wild horses have a very different diet from domesticated animals. Fruits and vegetables can cause serious injury or even death to the horse.
 
Wild Spanish Mustangs on the Outer Banks
 
 
 
 
 

Wilbur & Orville Wright Memorial

 
 

On Wednesday, 20 June 2001, we decided to visit the Wilbur & Orville Wright Memorial where we were staying in Kill Devil Hills, NC.

 
Wilbur and Orville Wright made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on 17 Dec 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build and fly experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
 
It was a VERY long walk to the top of the hill where the memorial is located
 
Curtis poses for a few photos with the memorial in the background
 
 
 
Bust of Orville and Wilbur Wright outside the Wright Brothers Memorial
   
 
Curtis mages to snap a photo of Carolyn
     
 
   Curtis snaps a photo of Beth atop Kill Devil Hill with the Atlantic Ocean in the background
 
Moving inside the Visitor Center
 
The Visitor Center is home to a museum featuring models and actual tools and machines used by the Wright brothers during their flight experiments including a reproduction of the wind tunnel used to test wing shapes and a portion of the engine used in the first flight. In one wing of the Visitor Center is a life-size replica of the Wright brothers' 1903 Flyer, the first powered heavier-than-air aircraft in history to achieve controlled flight (the original being displayed at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington D.C.). A full-scale model of the Brothers' 1902 glider is also present, having been constructed under the direction of Orville Wright himself.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Hill Devil Hills Beach, NC

 
 
For most of the time, our family has typically gone to Myrtle Beach, South Carolina when we wanted to got to the beach.
In 2001, we opted to go to the North Carolina Outer Banks.
 
Philip, Leslie, Brad, Beth, Savanna and Carolyn
 
Beth, Savanna, Leslie & Philip
 
 
To See All of the Beach Photos - CLICK HERE
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

SOURCES

 
 

All photos by Curtis D Loftin

Bodie Island Lighthouse - National Park Service - Click Here

Cape Hatteras Lighthouse - National Park Service - Click Here

Cape Lookout Lighthouse - National Park Service - Click Here

Cape Lookout Lighthouse - visitnc.com - Click Here

Corolla's Wild Horses - outerbanks.com - Click Here

Currituck Beach Lighthouse - Click Here

Elizabethan Gardens - Manteo, NC - Click Here

Wright Brother's National Memorial - Wikipedia - Click Here